Frog Photographer Robin Moore Hunts for the Rarest Creatures on Earth

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Robin Moore is both a nature photographer and a conservation biologist. An amphibian specialist, he uses his skills in photography to create beautiful photos of some of the most endangered frogs on Earth, sharing those images with the world to raise awareness.

In 2010, Moore teamed up with 120 researchers from 21 different countries on a hunt for lost species that were feared to be extinct — the team set out to find and photograph some of the most elusive creatures on Earth.

Here’s a 16-minute feature by BBC Earth in which Moore shares his passion in using photos for conservation:

In 2014, Moore published a book of his photos titled “In Search of Lost Frogs.” The 256-pages contain roughly 70,000 words and around 400 photos, and is currently the #1 ranked book on Amazon in the Amphibian Zoology section.

Here are some of Moore’s amazing photos showing some of the world’s rarest frogs:

The Cuchumatan Golden Toad, Incilius aurarius, from the Cuchumatanes mountains of Guatemala, found during a search for lost salamanders. This species was only discovered as recently as 2012.

The Cuchumatan Golden Toad, Incilius aurarius, from the Cuchumatanes mountains of Guatemala, found during a search for lost salamanders. This species was only discovered as recently as 2012.

An Hourglass Frog, Dendropsophus ebraccatus,  on a blade of grass in the Osa Peninsula.

An Hourglass Frog, Dendropsophus ebraccatus, on a blade of grass in the Osa Peninsula.

Reticulated Glass Frog, Hyalinobatrachium valerioi, on a leaf in the Osa Peninsula. Glass frogs are so-named because of their virtually transparent skin.

Reticulated Glass Frog, Hyalinobatrachium valerioi, on a leaf in the Osa Peninsula. Glass frogs are so-named because of their virtually transparent skin.

An Andes Poison Dart Frog, Ranitomeya opisthomelas, in the ChocÛ rainforest.

An Andes Poison Dart Frog, Ranitomeya opisthomelas, in the ChocÛ rainforest.

Red-eyed Treefrogs, Agalychnis calidryas, in amplexus in the Osa Peninsula.

Red-eyed Treefrogs, Agalychnis calidryas, in amplexus in the Osa Peninsula.

Golfo Dulce Poison Dart Frog, Phyllobates vittatus, in the Osa Peninsula, endangered. One of the most toxic frogs in the world.

Golfo Dulce Poison Dart Frog, Phyllobates vittatus, in the Osa Peninsula, endangered. One of the most toxic frogs in the world.

Variable Harlequin Frog, Atelopus varius, a critically endangered species that was feared extinct before being rediscovered in 2003.

Variable Harlequin Frog, Atelopus varius, a critically endangered species that was feared extinct before being rediscovered in 2003.

Juvenile Macaya Breast-spot Frog, Eleutherodactylus thorectes, a critically endangered species in the Massif de la Hotte. One of the smallest frogs in the world, it was rediscovered in 2010 after close to two decades.

Juvenile Macaya Breast-spot Frog, Eleutherodactylus thorectes, a critically endangered species in the Massif de la Hotte. One of the smallest frogs in the world, it was rediscovered in 2010 after close to two decades.

La Hotte Glanded Frog, Eleutherodactylus glandulifer, a critically endangered species on the Massif de la Hotte. Rediscovered after almost 20 years in 2010.

La Hotte Glanded Frog, Eleutherodactylus glandulifer, a critically endangered species on the Massif de la Hotte. Rediscovered after almost 20 years in 2010.

A new species of beaked toad - later dubbed the "Monty Burns Toad" on account of its similarity to the nefarious villain in the Simpsons - found in the Choco of Colombia whilst searching for a lost species.

A new species of beaked toad – later dubbed the “Monty Burns Toad” on account of its similarity to the nefarious villain in the Simpsons – found in the Choco of Colombia whilst searching for a lost species.

A Canal Zone Treefrog, Hypsiboas rufitelus, in the ChocÛ of Colombia with a shock of red webbing between the toes.

A Canal Zone Treefrog, Hypsiboas rufitelus, in the ChocÛ of Colombia with a shock of red webbing between the toes.

A glass frog, Hyalinobatrachium ruedai, peers through a leaf in the Choco of Colombia as we search for lost frogs.

A glass frog, Hyalinobatrachium ruedai, peers through a leaf in the Choco of Colombia as we search for lost frogs.

The Solomon Islands Eyelash Frog, Ceratobatrachus guentheri, skips the tadpole stage, opting instead to lay eggs on the forest floor.

The Solomon Islands Eyelash Frog, Ceratobatrachus guentheri, skips the tadpole stage, opting instead to lay eggs on the forest floor.

Finalist, BBC Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2012. Honorable Mention, FotoWeek DC Natural History Portfolio 2011. Eyelash frog, Ceratobatrachus guentheri, on a leaf

Finalist, BBC Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2012. Honorable Mention, FotoWeek DC Natural History Portfolio 2011. Eyelash frog, Ceratobatrachus guentheri, on a leaf

The Search for Lost Frogs project ended up producing over a dozen rediscoveries of species that were thought to have gone extinct.

You can find more of Moore’s photography and work over on his website. He also write about his various projects and adventures on his blog.

(via BBC Earth via SLR Lounge)


Image credits: Photographs by Robin Moore and used with permission

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